Tuesday, September 30, 2014

Telcos Mobilizing to Drive NFV Adoption [feedly]



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Telcos Mobilizing to Drive NFV Adoption
// The OpenStack Blog

Today the Linux Foundation announced the Open Platform for NFV (OPNFV) Project, a group comprised primarily of telco operators working across open source projects and vendors to implement Network Functions Virtualization (NFV) within their organizations. This is an exciting development because the market is growing quickly, and many OpenStack community members are also participating in OPNFV, giving us an opportunity to collaborate closely with another like-minded open source Foundation. User input is critical at this stage of a technology shift as significant as NFV will be for telco and even enterprise networks, and any organization that is willing to contribute knowledge and code to those efforts is welcome in the OpenStack community.

Much work has been done to build in support for NFV by the OpenStack community. Mark Lambe of SDN Central said on September 8, 2014:

"Network functions virtualization (NFV) is now synonymous with OpenStack. When people say NFV, there is an implication that they are talking about OpenStack."

Why is that? The open, modular and interoperable framework of the OpenStack project simplifies software. This flexibility is apparent in the OpenStack Networking component that features drivers and plug-ins from numerous leading telco vendors. Working through a project like OpenStack Networking, users do not have to worry about altering their APIs or modifying code if they decide to switch the underlying implementation technology. Much of the early interest surrounding NFV also led to updates in the OpenStack Compute component to meet the demanding requirements of the world's leading operators.

After our OpenStack Summit in May, an NFV community team formed to accelerate development around NFV-specific features. Led by community member and former compute Program Technical Leader Russell Bryant, the group includes telco giants AT&T and Verizon as well as operators like Telefonica, Orange, and Portugal Telecom, and technology companies such as Ericsson, Huawei, Intel, Red Hat, Canonical, Alcatel Lucent, Mirantis, eNovance, Wipro, Wind River, Cisco, NEC, Juniper, VMware, Mellanox, HP, and more. For more information on the technical progress being made to support NFV you can read Russell's blog post on this topic. The momentum surrounding NFV continues as we gear up for the Juno software release and OpenStack Summit Paris, where NFV-related topics and panels will dominate our telco strategies programming track. We hope to see you soon in Paris to continue our NFV work and conversation November 3 – 7, 2014.

OpenStack Summit Paris NFV presentations and panels:

Previous OpenStack Summit NFV Talks of Note:


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The New Citrix XenApp and XenDesktop 7.6 is Available [feedly]



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The New Citrix XenApp and XenDesktop 7.6 is Available
// Citrix Blogs

Want to make user logins and app access nearly instantaneous? Interested in boosting storage performance for XenApp and XenDesktop and reducing storage costs by up to 80%? Have you been waiting for the latest FIPS-compliant app and desktop delivery solution? Well, the wait is over and the Citrix mobile workspace journey just got better! The new Citrix XenApp and XenDesktop 7.6, announced last month, is…

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Citrix Receiver for HTML5 1.4 takes browser-based Windows app access to the next level [feedly]



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Citrix Receiver for HTML5 1.4 takes browser-based Windows app access to the next level
// Citrix Blogs

Citrix Receiver for HTML5 1.4 is the zero install, browser-based access mode to published Windows apps and desktops, delivered by Citrix XenApp and XenDesktop. This latest release of Receiver for HTML5 takes the experience to the next level, enabling more use cases for clientless access mode from Windows, Mac and Chrome devices. In this release, the graphics and audio-video performance is further tuned, so now…

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On Docker and Kubernetes on CloudStack [feedly]



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On Docker and Kubernetes on CloudStack
// CloudStack Blog

Docker has pushed containers to a new level, making it extremely easy to package and deploy applications within containers. Containers are not new, with Solaris containers and OpenVZ among several containers technologies going back 2005. But Docker has caught on quickly as mentioned by @adrianco. The startup speed is not surprising for containers, the portability is reminiscent of the Java goal to "write once run anywhere". What is truly interesting with Docker is that availability of Docker registries (e.g Docker Hub) to share containers and the potential to change the application deployment workflows.

Rightly so, we should soon see IT move to a docker based application deployment, where developers package their applications and make them available to Ops. Very much like we have been using war files. Embracing a DevOps mindset/culture should be easier with Docker. Where it becomes truly interesting is when we start thinking about an infrastructure whose sole purpose is to run containers. We can envision a bare operating system with a single goal to manage docker based services. This should make sys admin life easier.

The role of the Cloud with Docker

While the buzz around Docker has been truly amazing and a community has grown over night, some may think that this signals the end of the cloud. I think it is far from the truth as Docker may indeed become the killer app of the cloud.

A IaaS layer is what is: an infrastructure orchestration layer, while Docker and its ecosystem will become the application orchestration layer.

The question then becomes: How do I run Docker in the cloud ? And there is a straightforward answer: Just install Docker in your cloud templates. Whether on AWS or GCE or Azure or your private cloud, you can prepare linux based templates that provide Docker support. If you are aiming for the bare operating system whose sole purpose is to run Docker then the new CoreOS linux distribution might be your best pick. CoreOS provides rolling upgrades of the kernel, systemd based services, a distributed key value store (i.e etcd) and a distributed service scheduling system (i.e fleet)

exoscale an Apache CloudStack based public clouds, recently announced the availability of CoreOS templates.

Like exoscale, any cloud provider be it public or private can make CoreOS templates available. Providing Docker within the cloud instantly.

Docker application orchestration, here comes Kubernetes

Running one container is easy, but running multiple coordinated containers across a cluster of machines is not yet a solved problem. If you think of an application as a set of containers, starting these on multiple hosts, replicating some of them, accessing distributed databases, providing proxy services and fault tolerance is the true challenge.

However, Google came to the resuce and announced Kubernetes a system that solves these issues and makes managing scalable, fault-tolerant container based apps doable :)

Kubernetes is of course available on Google public cloud GCE, but also in Rackspace, Digital Ocean and Azure. It can also be deployed on CoreOS easily.

Kubernetes on CloudStack

Kubernetes is under heavy development, you can test it with Vagrant. Under the hood, aside from the go code :), most of the deployment solutions use SaltStack recipes but if you are a Chef, Puppet or Ansible user I am sure we will see recipes for those configuration management solution soon.

But you surely got the same idea that I had :) Since Kubernetes can be deployed on CoreOS and that CoreOS is available on exoscale. We are just a breath away from running Kubernetes on CloudStack.

It took a little more than a breath, but you can clone kubernetes-exoscale and you will get running in 10 minutes. With a 3 node etcd cluster and a 5 node kubernetes cluster, running a Flannel overlay.

CloudStack supports EC2 like userdata, and the CoreOS templates on exoscale support cloud-init, hence passing some cloud-config files to the instance deployment was straightforward. I used libcloud to provision all the nodes, created proper security groups to let the Kubernetes nodes access the etcd cluster and let the Kubernetes nodes talk to each other, especially to open a UDP port to build a networking overlay with Flannel. Fleet is used to launch all the Kubernetes services. Try it out.

Conclusions.

Docker is extremely easy to use and taking advantage of a cloud you can get started quickly. CoreOS will put your docker work on steroid with availability to start apps as systemd services over a distributed cluster. Kubernetes will up that by giving you replication of your containers and proxy services for free (time).

We might see pure docker based public clouds (e.g think Mesos cluster with a Kubernetes framework). These will look much more like PaaS, especially if they integrate a Docker registry and a way to automatically build docker images (e.g think continuous deployment pipeline).

But a "true" IaaS is actually very complimentary, providing multi-tenancy, higher security as well as multiple OS templates. So treating docker as a standard cloud workload is not a bad idea. With three dominant public clouds in AWS, GCE and Azure and a multitude of "regional" ones like exoscale it appears that building a virtualization based cloud is a solved problem (at least with Apache CloudStack :)).

So instead of talking about cloudifying your application, maybe you should start thinking about Dockerizing your applications and letting them loose on CloudStack.


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Public Hotfixes: Hotfix XS62ESP1011 - For XenServer 6.2.0 Service Pack 1 [feedly]



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Public Hotfixes: Hotfix XS62ESP1011 - For XenServer 6.2.0 Service Pack 1
// Feed for XenServer 6.2.0

This is a hotfix for customers running XenServer 6.2.0 Service Pack 1.
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Monday, September 29, 2014

Update OS X Now to Fix the Shellshock Vulnerability [feedly]



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Update OS X Now to Fix the Shellshock Vulnerability
// Gizmodo

Update OS X Now to Fix the Shellshock Vulnerability

Good news, Mac users. Apple just released an update for OS X that fixes a security flaw in the Bash UNIX shell. This is the part of the software that's vulnerable to the Shellshock bug uncovered last week. And although the vulnerability only affects a small number of Mac users, a fix is certainly welcome.

Before you go downloading, you should check which version of OS X you're running. Mavericks users can download the OS X bash update 1.0 here. Lion and Mountain Lion users can download their bash updates here and here, respectively. There's no need to wait by the way. This bug is kind of a big deal, so you should act fast. [9to5 Mac]


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DevOps Newsletter 196 [feedly]



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10 skills that will make you a better Rubyist [feedly]



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10 skills that will make you a better Rubyist
// RubyFlow

Just published new blog post about 10 skills you need to master to become a better Ruby developer.

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Placement in VDI Environments [feedly]



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Placement in VDI Environments
// Virtualization Management Software & Data Center Control | VMTurbo » VMTurbo Blog

Server virtualization has been great for IT. It promises to help drive up datacenter efficiencies while allowing applications to get all the resources they need. But, Virtual environments in general are very complex to manage. We have to look at … READ MORE

The post Placement in VDI Environments appeared first on Virtualization Management Software & Data Center Control | VMTurbo.


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The Beginner's Guide to Apache CloudStack Series! Part 1 - an Intro to Apache CloudStack [feedly]



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The Beginner's Guide to Apache CloudStack Series! Part 1 - an Intro to Apache CloudStack
// CloudStack Blog

Last week, the CloudStack Silicon Valley Users Group held a meetup in Sunnyvale, CA at NetApp. Thank you to Kim White, Ray Mar and NetApp for hosting our group on Thursday evening!

John Kinsella kicked off the night with an introduction of our speaker, Geoff Higginbottom, and a quick reminder about the CloudStack Collaboration Conference Europe held in Budapest, Hungary on November 19-21st, 2014. The schedule is now available. Register now! ApacheCon Europe will be co-located with the CloudStack Collaboration Conference from November 17-21st, 2014.

Our guest speaker for the evening was Geoff Higginbottom, CTO of ShapeBlue Ltd and a leading CloudStack implementation specialist. Geoff has designed numerous Apache CloudStack and Citrix CloudPlatform Cloud Infrastructures, for both Public and Private Cloud use cases. Geoff regularly speaks at the CloudStack European User Group and designed and delivers a very successful CloudStack 2 Day Bootcamp course (which has been delivered around the globe). We were very lucky that Geoff happened to be in the US helping a CloudStack User get their cloud up and running last week. He took time to speak at the CloudStack Silicon Valley User group giving insights on designing CloudStack clouds and answering numerous questions from the attendees!

Geoff started off the meetup with an introduction to CloudStack and gave a live demonstration of the technology.

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The slides for An Intro to Apache CloudStack will be available in about 2 weeks.

After the introduction to CloudStack, Geoff shared his significant experience of designing CloudStack Clouds, summarizing a tried and tested approach.

The Slides to Designing a Production Ready CloudStack Cloud are available here.

Our sponsor, NetApp offered to record both sessions and the video will be posted in about two weeks.

On behalf of the organizers (John Kinsella, Animesh Chaturvedi, Ilya Musayef and myself), we want to thank NetApp for hosting the CloudStack Silicon Valley Users Group and providing a spacious venue, pizza and beer for the CloudStackers.

Feedback comments & ratings:

"Geoff presented information on a variety of levels - All of it useful and actionable!"

The meetup received a total of 4.5 stars out of 5. Thanks to those who voted!

Do you want to attend the next CloudStack meetup in the Silicon Valley? Become a member of our growing group and join us for pizza, beer and CloudStack talks! Visit: http://www.meetup.com/CloudStack-Silicon-Valley-User-Group/

We're hoping to hold the next meetup in October 2014. Stay tuned!


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Sibos 2014 tackles pivotal technology trends, encourages Financial IT to “buckle in” [feedly]



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Sibos 2014 tackles pivotal technology trends, encourages Financial IT to "buckle in"
// Citrix Blogs

When asked to describe his firm's approach to IT strategy in an interview last year, Joel Schwalbe, CIO of CNL Financial, paraphrased a famous quote by Wayne Gretzky, stating that they "skate to where the puck is going to be, not where it's at or where it's been." With this statement, Joel alludes to the challenges financial IT face when trying to keep pace with…

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Chef analytics 1.0.3 released [feedly]



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Chef analytics 1.0.3 released
// Chef Blog

Chef analytics 1.0.3 is a bug-fix release to allow you to use your own SSL certificates.

Fixed Bugs

* Allow SSL attribute configuration from opscode-analytics.rb

Upgrade Instructions

Download

Download the latest version of Chef analytics (1.0.3) from https://downloads.getchef.com/analytics/

Upgrade

To upgrade, install the new package and reconfigure:

> opscode-analytics-ctl stop

> opscode-analytics-ctl reconfigure

> opscode-analytics-ctl start

 


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New Quick Start - Windows PowerShell Desired State Configuration (DSC) on AWS [feedly]



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New Quick Start - Windows PowerShell Desired State Configuration (DSC) on AWS
// Amazon Web Services Blog

PowerShell Desired State Configuration (DSC) is a powerful tool for system administrators. Introduced as part of Windows Management Framework 4.0, it helps to automate system setup and maintenance for Windows Server 2008 R2 and Windows Server 2012 R2, Windows 7, Windows 8.1, and Linux environments. It can install or remove server roles and features, manage registry settings, environment variables, files, directories, and services, and processes. It can also manage local users and groups, install and manage MSI and EXE packages, and run PowerShell scripts. DSC can discover the system configuration on a given instance, and it can also fix a configuration that has drifted away from the desired state.

We have just published a new Quick Start Reference Deployment to make it easier for you to take advantage of PowerShell Desired State Configuration in your AWS environment.

This new document will show you how to:

  • Use AWS CloudFormation and PowerShell DSC to bootstrap your servers and applications from scratch.
  • Deploy a highly available PowerShell DSC pull server environment on AWS.
  • Detect and remedy configuration drift after your application stack has been deployed.

This detailed (24 page) document contains all of the information that you will need to get started. The deployed pull server is robust and fault-tolerant; it includes a pair of web servers and Active Directory domain controllers. It can be accessed from on-premises devices and from instances running in the AWS Cloud.

-- Jeff;


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Citrix - XenMobile and ShareFile [feedly]



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Citrix - XenMobile and ShareFile
// CitrixTV RSS Feed

The following video highlights the synergies between XenMobile and ShareFile for delivering a complete EMM (Enterprise Mobility Management) solution.
Views:5
Length:03:12

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Top 5 Questions from Citrix Service Provider Technical Office Hours – September 2014 [feedly]



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Top 5 Questions from Citrix Service Provider Technical Office Hours – September 2014
// Citrix Blogs

Citrix Service Provider Technical Office Hours enable Citrix Service Providers to share tough – or basic – technical questions with Citrix experts. Via GoToWebinar, service providers around the globe have direct access to Citrix experts from engineering, architecture, product management, technical sales, product marketing, the Citrix Service Provider Program team and the Citrix Solutions Lab. Current Citrix Service Provider partners can view the full webinars…

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Personal vDisk (PvD) And Hypervisor Throttling in XenDesktop 7.6 [feedly]



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Personal vDisk (PvD) And Hypervisor Throttling in XenDesktop 7.6
// Citrix Blogs

The Purpose of This Post Sometimes a small change adds great value or alleviates a pain point. This post today is about one of those small changes. With XenDesktop 7.6 a new setting called "Simultaneous Personal vDisk Inventory Updates (Absolute)" has been added to the Hypervisor Connection screen. But in order to appreciate the present, it is important to understand the past and the pitfalls…

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Citrix NetScaler Shortlisted for Best Virtualization Innovation 2014 [feedly]



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Citrix NetScaler Shortlisted for Best Virtualization Innovation 2014
// Citrix Blogs

Citrix is honored that the Citrix NetScaler Application Delivery Controller (ADC) with Citrix TriScale has been selected as a finalist for the 2014 Broadband InfoVision Awards -  Best Virtualization Innovation. The Citrix NetScaler ADC supports a harmonious co-existence between the physical networks of today and the virtual networks of tomorrow by supporting three platform options: a single hardware based ADC (MPX), a software based virtual…

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AWS Week in Review - September 22, 2014 [feedly]



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AWS Week in Review - September 22, 2014
// Amazon Web Services Blog

Let's take a quick look at what happened in AWS-land last week. I recently discovered a brand-new set of in-depth AWS articles from Intense School. I am more than happy to include informative, relevant, and timely articles from other partners, bloggers, and so forth. Please let me know when you publish something that you believe would be of attention to the AWS community. I'll do my best to check it out.

Monday, September 22
Tuesday, September 23
Wednesday, September 24
Thursday, September 25
Friday, September 26

Stay tuned for next week! In the meantime, follow me on Twitter and subscribe to the RSS feed.

-- Jeff;


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OpenShift, Kubernetes, Docker and Apache Hadoop YARN [feedly]



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OpenShift, Kubernetes, Docker and Apache Hadoop YARN
// Hortonworks

At Hortonworks, we are always watching emerging trends in the datacenter to find opportunities for deeper ecosystem integration with Apache Hadoop in simple and intuitive ways. We first partnered with OpenShift by Red Hat earlier this year when we made it possible to call out to Hadoop services from OpenShift via cartridges. You can read more about that solution here. As Enterprise Cloud (e.g. PaaS) offerings have matured to support a broad set of workloads, we've had a number of our customers ask about how Hadoop-centered Big Data and PaaS initiatives could work together – particularly in light of Apache Hadoop YARN being the multi-workload resource manager for batch, interactive and real-time workloads on Hadoop. Docker and Google Kubernetes have rapidly growing communities and expanding awareness – even Microsoft added some Kubernetes support for running on Azure. However, another partner's participation also caught our attention – OpenShift by Red Hat was moving to make these technologies the core of their next generation PaaS platform.

To us, it seemed like a great opportunity to help bring the two worlds together for our customers – Hadoop and PaaS – and ensure that with YARN we can provide:

  • Common resource management across data and PaaS workloads and manage them seamlessly and elastically.
  • Deeper insights and information gleaned from data in the enterprise; not merely limit Hadoop to data processing applications and data services.

Our strategy for making this happen is to work closely in the open source community to develop these new capabilities upstream to drive innovation and integration that can then be brought to market in a stable and tested manner. We share this strategy with Red Hat and are working together to integrate YARN into the Kubernetes pluggable scheduler position as an option found in OpenShift v3.

OpenShift transforms PaaS

In the world of PaaS, there is a rapid shift from legacy, heavyweight virtual machines to lightweight and secure containers. Red Hat is a leading contributor to the Docker community, and OpenShift v3 is an exciting new initiative by Red Hat to provide a unified DevOps experience built on a best-of-breed technology stack leveraging Project Atomic, Docker and Google Kubernetes aligned with an intuitive user experience. OpenShift has managed to preserve its developer workflow while commoditizing its architecture to align with industry standards. In one simple motion OpenShift has grown its reference architecture to include that of both the Docker and Google communities. OpenShift has become an epicenter for how PaaS use cases are instrumented on these highly coveted technologies. This consolidation of open source technology initiatives promises to change the way applications are built and deployed in a PaaS environment.

YARN and Multi-tenant Data Lakes

In today's Hadoop deployments, we at Hortonworks see very large clusters spanning thousands of machines and petabytes of data on commodity hardware in the customer datacenter. As organizations scale their Hadoop deployments, they want to run more analytic applications with different data access paradigms – batch, interactive, real-time, streaming etc. all that need to access the data simultaneously. These data lake deployments are enabled by a modern data architecture powered by YARN, to provide a robust and comprehensive solution for the most demanding Hadoop environments. In addition to powering a rich variety of Hadoop processing engines, YARN is being embraced by key industry-leading analytic software vendors to leverage and extract compute and data resources from existing Hadoop clusters and extend Hadoop with very rich analytic capabilities.

Big Data and PaaS—Better Together

So far, enterprises have deployed and managed separate infrastructures for Hadoop and PaaS. This leads to fragmentation of compute resources and infrastructure silos with duplicate provisioning, management and monitoring tools. By leveraging Hadoop YARN as the underlying resource management infrastructure for both workloads we get obvious benefits of seamlessly sharing resources.

Imagine this: as you roll out a seasonal campaign to customers wouldn't it be nice to temporarily, and painlessly, borrow a few resources from your data workloads via YARN and then return after a few days or weeks. The alternative today, as many IT departments are painfully aware, is they need to plan in advance, procure new hardware and then decommission at the end of the campaign a few weeks later – very involved indeed! This seriously affects agility and speed at which enterprises can bring new products and services to the market – YARN and OpenShift come to the rescue.

From the lens of data workers in the Hadoop world – this integration provides a very important capability of leveraging OpenShift to present the insights teased from their datasets in simple and intuitive ways. For example, one can now use Pig or Hive to cleanse data, to build models and then immediately turn that analysis into an interactive web application by deploying Shiny in OpenShift. This allows data to turn into actionable insight seamlessly!

HDPwithK

YARN—Big Data and PaaS Together

By integrating OpenShift with Hadoop YARN, Red Hat and Hortonworks customers can now benefit from:

  1. Predictable elastic resource management for co-existing Hadoop workloads and OpenShift application platform workloads.
  2. Unified Resource Management console for managing OpenShift and Hadoop resources.
  3. Turn data into actionable insights that can be presented seamlessly to the entire organization.

Summary

Integrating OpenShift by Red Hat, Google Kubernetes, and Docker with Apache Hadoop YARN provides tremendous benefits to customers using OpenShift and Hadoop. It is a great example of the openness and vision shown by Red Hat and how Hadoop YARN is emerging as an intelligent scheduler plugin to OpenShift in the datacenter and public cloud by helping drive this community-driven innovation.

We hope you will join us on this exciting journey!!

Discover and Learn More

The post OpenShift, Kubernetes, Docker and Apache Hadoop YARN appeared first on Hortonworks.


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Why A Microservice Architecture Needs DBaaS [feedly]



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Why A Microservice Architecture Needs DBaaS
// Build AWS-compatible Private Clouds with CumuLogic

The microservices architectural pattern is quickly becoming synonymous with what people consider to be "cloud native" systems. As companies are shifting to a model of cloud-first for new applications, and even re-thinking their approach for some of their core systems, the microservices approach is gaining in popularity.

While most discussion of microservices is focused on the application architecture, there is less being discussed about the impact of this architectural approach on the data persistence layer, application DBA's and how DBaaS can be a helpful component to successfully building new applications as a set of microservices. In this post, we'll touch on some of the higher level concepts that the microservices approach implies, paying particular attention to the "data" impacts.

What's a Microservices Architecture?

In essence, the microservices pattern is one where a software system is comprised of a number of independently deployable services, each with a limited scope of responsibility. Typically, the scope of responsibility is considered to be some particular aspect of business capability that it can own end to end. In some cases, a microservice might rely on other lower-level services to deliver it's functionality, but this is less frequent than purely independent services.

The microservices architectural approach allows for each service to be developed by independent teams, scaled individually and managed as a product throughout it's lifecycle. A well implemented microservices architecture also ensures that the overall system is able to gracefully degrade it's functionality of one or more services are offline.

Monolithic vs Microservices Architecture

Monolithic vs Microservices Architecture

To achieve the goals of the approach, that independence and isolation needs to be provided all the way down to the data persistence layer. What good is a group of independent services if they all relied on the same database system? Having a single database for the services would leave the system with a single point of failure, and reduce the ability of each service development team to truly operate as an isolated unit.

Organizational Impacts

Conway's Law is a particularly relevant adage worth understanding if you're planning on adopting the microservices approach to any team-based development effort.

It says:

Organizations which design systems … are constrained to produce designs which are copies of the communication structures of these organizations. (M. Conway, 1968)

What we have found in the technology industry is that not only is that statement typically true, but that tendency can be harnessed to help drive the actual architecture of a system being built. If you are structured into teams that represent the "three tier" architecture, that architecture is the likely result of every project you embark on. Conversely, if your development organization is structured as a group of independent units, each responsible for some aspect of the software's overall business processes, you'll get a system architecture that reflects that organizational structure.

This isn't to say that organizing your teams into functional units will actually result in a good example of a microservices architecture being developed (there are too many other variables like team skill, etc…), but without taking Conway's Law into account you'll struggle to achieve the goal. It also doesn't necessarily require that reporting lines reflect your architectural goal. It's quite possible to get the same organizational dynamics through a matrix management approach as well.

This type of organizational thinking is particularly new for the DBA community, who are used to being a centralized team within most companies. We posted previously about our thoughts on Reinventing the role of the DBA, and it's particularly relevant to the microservices discussion. DBA's need to be part of each service team. Perhaps the effort required from a DBA isn't "full time" for a single team, so DBA's could certainly be shared across multiple service teams. What's important is for each DBA to understand that they are helping to create an isolated system within each services, and they should resist the instinct to centralize all of the data from each team they work with into a single database.

How Database-as-a-Service Supports Microservice Development

At this point, you should understand that adopting microservices as an architectural approach for your system can imply a number of thing that impact the data persistence layer, and the teams charged with being the data custodians for your organization. Specifically:

  1. Each microservice, if responsible for storing any data, should have it's own database.
  2. Independent teams may select different database technologies, based on their own needs.
  3. DBA's should focus on being data experts for the service teams, but resist the urge to centralize data into a single system.

The obvious outcome of these implications is that there will be an explosion in the number of distinct databases, potentially different database engines and an increased operational complexity. This is where Database-as-a-Service can help. A good DBaaS environment should address each of these implications directly, reducing the management and operational concerns significantly.

Self Service – Letting each service development team instantly get new database instances means that they don't have to wait for a central DBA team to spin up a new environment.

Multi-engine Support – Having more than one database flavor in the DBaaS service catalog allows the service development teams to pick what's right for them, without concern for burdensome organizational "standards".

Fully Automated Operations – DBAs need to focus on helping the service development teams understand how to best work with the data they are responsible for, and a DBaaS approach to database operations significantly reduces the time they need to spend on the traditional "infrastructure-centric" aspects of being a DBA.

See How CumuLogic's DBaaS Platform Can Help

CumuLogic's DBaaS Platform is specifically designed to let organizations operate their own DBaaS platform, running on any infrastructure (public cloud, private cloud, or even bare metal). If you'd like to learn more about how CumuLogic could help your organization build software to be much more "cloud native", please get in touch or request a sandbox environment to try the system for yourself.


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