Monday, February 20, 2017

pfSense 2.3.3 RELEASE Now Available! [feedly]

pfSense 2.3.3 RELEASE Now Available!
https://blog.pfsense.org/?p=2325

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We are happy to announce the release of pfSense® software version 2.3.3!

This is a maintenance release in the 2.3.x series, bringing numerous stability and bug fixes, fixes for a handful of security issues in the GUI, and a handful of new features. The full list of changes is on the 2.3.3 New Features and Changes page, including a list of FreeBSD and internal security advisories addressed by this release.

This release includes fixes for 101 bugs, 14 Features, and 3 Todo items.

If you haven't yet caught up on the changes in 2.3.x, check out the Features and Highlights video. Past blog posts have covered some of the changes, such as the performance improvements from tryforward, and the webGUI update.


Upgrade Considerations

As always, you can upgrade from any prior version directly to 2.3.3. The Upgrade Guidecovers everything you'll need to know for upgrading in general.  There are a few areas where additional caution should be exercised with this upgrade if upgrading from 2.2.x or an earlier release, all noted in the 2.3 Upgrade Guide.

Known Regressions

While, nearly all of the common regressions between 2.2.6 and 2.3-RELEASE have been fixed in subsequent releases, the following still exist:

  • IPsec IPComp does not work. This is disabled by default. However in 2.3.1, it is automatically not enabled to avoid encountering this problem. Bug 6167
  • IGMP Proxy does not work with VLAN interfaces, and possibly other edge cases. Bug 6099. This is a little-used component. If you're not sure what it is, you're not using it. This has been fixed on our 2.4 development branch.
  • Those using IPsec and OpenBGPD may have non-functional IPsec unless OpenBGPD is removed. Bug 6223

Packages

Compared to pfSense 2.2.x, the list of available packages in pfSense 2.3.x has been significantly trimmed.  We have removed packages that have been deprecated upstream, no longer have an active maintainer, or were never stable. A few have yet to be converted for Bootstrap and may return if converted. See the 2.3 Removed Packages list for details.  pfSense 2.3.3 does bring back tinc (Mesh VPN), LCDproc, TFTP Server, and a new package "cellular" for use with some Huawei model 3G/4G cellular cards. Also noteworthy in case you missed it is the recently added ACME package for use with Let's Encrypt which is available on 2.3.2-p1, 2.3.3, and 2.4.

pfSense software is Open Source

For those who wish to review the source code in full detail, the changes are all publicly available in three repositories on Github. 2.3.3 is built from the RELENG_2_3_3 branch of each repository.

Main repository – the web GUI, back end configuration code, and build tools.
FreeBSD source – the source code, with patches of the FreeBSD 10.3 base.
FreeBSD ports – the FreeBSD ports used.

Download

Downloads are available on the mirrors as usual.

Downloads for New Installs and Upgrades to Existing Systems – note it's usually easier to just use the auto-update functionality, in which case you don't need to download anything from here. Check the Firmware Updates page for details.

Supporting the Project

Our efforts are made possible by the support our customers and the community. You can support our efforts via one or more of the following.

  • pfSense Store –  official hardware, apparel and pre-loaded USB sticks direct from the source.  Our pre-installed appliances are the fast, easy way to get up and running with a fully-optimized system. All are now shipping with 2.3 release installed.
  • Gold subscription – Immediate access to past hang out recordings as well as the latest version of the book after logging in to the members area.
  • Commercial Support – Purchasing support from us provides you with direct access to the pfSense team.
  • Professional Services – For more involved and complex projects outside the scope of support, our most senior engineers are available under professional services.

Current State Clarity, Part 4 – Chef Provisioning [feedly]

Current State Clarity, Part 4 – Chef Provisioning
https://blog.chef.io/2017/02/08/current-state-clarity-part-4-chef-provisioning/

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This post is part 4 of a 4 part series.  Read Part 1 for an overview of the current state of the ecosystem, Part 2 on Policyfiles, and Part 3 on Push Jobs.

I spent a good portion of my career tackling provisioning problems. Chances are, if you met me at a Chef event, we probably talked about Chef Provisioning. Before diving in any further, I'd like to point out that Chef works well with just about any modern provisioning tool. Bootstrapping a Chef node is straightforward and a number of clean abstractions for those steps exist in various forms when you look across the landscape of provisioning tools. Many options exist for provisioning your infrastructure and which of those is right for you depends on a number of factors. In this post, I'm only going to cover the Chef Provisioning framework.

The Problem

Chef recipes allow you to compose your application infrastructure in flexible and powerful ways. We spend time testing and perfecting our recipe code by applying it to a single test node. We end up with a robust code base that can build or rebuild our application infrastructure as needed. Then, it comes time to do just that: let's build our application stack on a cluster of new machines. Okay, but how should we do that? Knife plugins only focus on single machines. We can wrap knife in brittle scripts, use some homegrown code to do the job, or we can learn how to use a new tool.

The Chef Provisioning framework grew out of a desire to provide Chef users a way to manage entire clusters of machines by extending the language and practices that they already know: Chef recipes. To do that, Chef Provisioning provides new base resources to manage common infrastructure components (machine and load_balancer), resources to manage basic orchestration (machine_file and machine_execute), and resources to manage provisioning-specific tasks (machine_batch and machine_image).  Beyond those shared strategies, Chef Provisioning uses a plugin architecture (drivers) to implement specific strategies unique to various infrastructure ecosystems.

Chef Provisioning: Benefits

If you're used to writing Chef cookbooks, using recipes and resources to manage your infrastructure makes a lot of sense. As with your Chef managed nodes, with Chef Provisioning your entire infrastructure is now testable, versionable, and convergent. Chef Provisioning provides an abstraction layer to simplify complexity by providing a common interface across multiple ecosystems.

Drivers for Chef Provisioning provide infrastructure-specific functionality for individual providers. The three most active drivers for Chef Provisioning manage infrastructure in AWS, Azure, and via fog (the Ruby multi-cloud services library). Each driver provides a different subset of customization options for shared resources (e.g. machine) along with custom resources for the specific needs of the ecosystem. For example, the AWS driver provides resources to manage VPCs, Auto Scaling Groups, RDS instances, Elasticsearch domains, IAM roles, and lots more. By using these custom resources, it's possible for users to manage their production application stacks from the same interface by which they manage server configurations: Chef recipes.

Chef Provisioning not only provisions your infrastructure, it will also register and deregister machines against your Chef server as appropriate. Chef Provisioning is open-source and additional drivers (some maintained by the Chef community) are available for use. Chef Provisioning is a community driven project. Open, weekly office hours for Chef Provisioning have been running since 2015 (thanks, Tyler!) and you can always pop into the the Chef community slack channel to discuss Chef Provisioning.

Chef Provisioning: Drawbacks

If you're not used to writing Chef cookbooks, using recipes and resources to manage your infrastructure adds in a lot of complexity. If you're not already a savvy Chef user, you'll likely have a hard time with this community-driven project. Depending on the driver, docs aren't always up to date and often times you may find yourself digging into code internals to figure out how something works or to debug obscure issues.

Chef Provisioning drivers also have varying degrees of activity. For example, the Vagrant and SSH-based provisioning drivers haven't been actively maintained. Yet, the driver for VMware vRealize Automation was just recently released. Some, like the AWS driver, have received a lot of attention and have a full CI testing pipeline set up. Referring back to our original post in this series, Chef Software Inc. will support use of Chef Provisioning and its drivers, but this is not where we are currently investing development resources. Chef Provisioning relies on support from the community for the development of new features.

Providing an abstraction layer to simplify complexity across multiple infrastructure providers has also proven to be elusive. Individual infrastructure ecosystems are each becoming increasingly complex (with no signs of slowing) and their management cannot be effectively hidden behind one single interface.  The complexity of individual infrastructure providers ultimately bubbles up to the surface.  As a result, the single interface itself becomes an additional piece of complexity. In the end, Chef Provisioning does not reduce complexity as much as it provides a familiar interface.

What this means for you

Should you be using Chef Provisioning to manage your infrastructure? You should understand the benefits and cost before making that decision. Successful users of Chef Provisioning practice the following behaviors:

  • They are already intimately familiar with writing Chef recipes and composing resources
  • They manage cloud infrastructure in AWS, Microsoft Azure, VMware, or with Fog
  • They have a solid workflow for managing cookbook development and deployment (i.e. pipelines with dependency management)
  • They are comfortable with code spelunking when something goes wrong and they need to troubleshoot
  • They are engaged with the Chef Provisioning community

Chef Provisioning fits the needs of a specific subset of Chef users. This is not a definitive list, but rather a guideline to help you more readily determine if you can be successful with Chef Provisioning. However, for example, you may be comfortable using Chef Provisioning with a less maintained driver because it meets your needs sufficiently. That works too.

What this means for the Chef Community

Chef Provisioning has interesting applications and I personally, like others in the Chef community, find many of the patterns postulated by its convergent infrastructure approach fascinating and useful. But as we've seen above, there are some significant hurdles for adoption and a significant amount of work is necessary to help drive this community project forward.

Chef Provisioning could benefit from a substantial code refactor. While a wealth of coverage exists for native cloud provider services in AWS via custom resources, that's a perpetually moving target and additional resources would expand the reach of use cases Chef Provisioning can help solve. If you'd like to help develop Chef Provisioning further, engage with the Chef Provisioning community to explore options for doing so.

Chef Provisioning has a small, but passionate, following in the Chef community. If you'd like to learn more about how you can use Chef Provisioning successfully, consider joining the #chef-provisioning channel in the Chef community slack.

Conclusion

All of the projects discussed in this series (Policyfiles, Push Jobs, and Chef Provisioning) are not currently slated for further development by Chef Software, Inc. For clarity, these tools are fully supported by Chef and your investments in these projects are safe. This series is meant to help you understand their current benefits and drawbacks so you can clearly decide if these tools are right for you.

Chef is an open-source company and we are dedicated to responding to the needs of our customers. While we do not expect these tools to receive new features at this time, new features may be implemented if they're contributed by the community. If you're an avid user of these tools and would like to see them developed further, please engage with their user communities and with our Product team so that we can explore your use case and options together.

We hope this series has provided clarity for the current state of these tools. If you have additional questions or concerns, please feel free to reach out. Find me on Twitter or the Chef community slack.

Many thanks to the contributors in this series: Megan Gleason, Charles Johnson, Julian Dunn, Tyler Ball, Marc Anderson, Tim Smith, Thom May, Shanku Niyogi, Adam Jacob, Nathen Harvey, Yvo Van Doorn, Nell Shamrell-Harrington, and Stuart Preston.

The post Current State Clarity, Part 4 – Chef Provisioning appeared first on Chef Blog.


Wednesday, February 8, 2017

Smart TV Maker Fined $2.2 Million For Spying on Its 11 Million Users [feedly]



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Smart TV Maker Fined $2.2 Million For Spying on Its 11 Million Users
// The Hacker News

Your government is spying on you! Businesses are spying on you! Your phone and browser are constantly spying on you! Even your TV is spying on you! Yes, you should also worry about your "smart" TV, as one of the world's biggest smart TV makers Vizio has been caught secretly collecting its consumers' data through over 11 Million smart TVs and then selling them to third-parties without the

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New “Fileless Malware” Targets Banks and Organizations Spotted in the Wild [feedly]



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New "Fileless Malware" Targets Banks and Organizations Spotted in the Wild
// The Hacker News

More than a hundred banks and financial institutions across the world have been infected with a dangerous sophisticated, memory-based malware that's almost undetectable, researchers warned. Newly published report by the Russian security firm Kaspersky Lab indicates that hackers are targeting banks, telecommunication companies, and government organizations in 40 countries, including the US,

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Thousands of WordPress Sites Hacked Using Recently Disclosed Vulnerability [feedly]



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Thousands of WordPress Sites Hacked Using Recently Disclosed Vulnerability
// The Hacker News

Last week, we reported about a critical zero-day flaw in WordPress that was silently patched by the company before hackers have had their hands on the nasty bug to exploit millions of WordPress websites. To ensure the security of millions of websites and its users, WordPress delayed the vulnerability disclosure for over a week and worked closely with security companies and hosts to install

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Macro Malware Comes to macOS [feedly]

Macro Malware Comes to macOS
https://threatpost.com/macro-malware-comes-to-macos/123640/

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Cybercriminals have developed macro malware for the macOS, the first time this technique has been spotted on the Apple platform.  

Tuesday, February 7, 2017

Quantifying Outcomes: Digital transformation and the competitive edge [feedly]



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Quantifying Outcomes: Digital transformation and the competitive edge
// Chef Software

This webinar is part one of a four part series that examines how digital transformation enables you to outperform competitors. Digital transformation occurs when a company adopts technologies and practices that change it from one that ships its software slowly and painfully to one that ships software quickly while, at the same time, improving its quality and mitigating risk. Businesses that embrace digital transformation outperform their competitors: they capitalize on disruption rather than allowing themselves to be disrupted. They deliver their software faster, with higher efficiency and lower risk. These advances can be quantified to prove their effectiveness. This short-form webinar series invites you to participate in a discussion on how to implement digital transformation and which metrics demonstrate progress on your journey. The first part of our series, focuses on the overall challenges businesses face in the marketplace and how to gauge where you stand. Subsequent webinars will focus on specific measures that move transformation forward. Join us to: - Learn how industry trends shape your internal challenges - Explore how companies have resolved tensions between central IT organizations and development teams - Learn how to use industry metrics to determine where you should be focusing your efforts - Participate in a virtual roundtable discussion where you can ask the questions most relevant to you Who should attend: - Director/VP of technology teams (Engineering/IT/DevOps/etc) - Technology executives (CIO/CTO) - Management seeking strategic alignment w/ business objectives
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Quantifying Outcomes - Managing Risk [feedly]



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Quantifying Outcomes - Managing Risk
// Chef Software

This webinar is part two of a four part series that focuses on the steps you should take to bring about digital transformation in your organization. In this webinar, we talk about ways to manage risk. Traditionally, determining whether an application and its supporting infrastructure meet an organization's information security standards is tacked on as an afterthought, at the end of the development and testing cycle. In contrast, high-performing organizations that have undergone digital transformation treat these requirements as fundamental to a successful software deployment and shift security and compliance testing far to the left. Industry metrics demonstrate that embedding compliance requirements into the deployment pipeline improves your ability to ship your software faster. This short-form webinar series invites you to participate in a discussion on how to implement digital transformation and which metrics demonstrate progress on your journey. Join us to: - Explore the role of automated compliance solutions - Learn which industry metrics demonstrate your successful efforts to mitigate risk - Participate in a virtual roundtable discussion where you can ask the questions most relevant to you Who should attend: - Director/VP of technology teams (Engineering/IT/DevOps/etc) - Technology executives (CIO/CTO) - Management seeking strategic alignment w/ business objectives
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Quantifying Outcomes - Efficient Service Stability [feedly]



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Quantifying Outcomes - Efficient Service Stability
// Chef Software

This webinar is part four of a four part series that focuses on the steps you should take to bring about digital transformation in your organization. In this webinar, we talk about how to decrease change failure rates. High-performing organizations that have undergone digital transformation have very low rates of failure when introducing changes. Key to this resiliency is that these organizations focus on improving how quickly they recover from failures rather than trying to prevent failures from happening. By emphasizing recovery over prevention, they achieve a substantially higher rate of service resiliency. Industry metrics prove that this capability is part of an overall approach to outperforming your competitors. This short-form webinar series invites you to participate in a discussion on how to implement digital transformation and which metrics demonstrate progress on your journey. Join us to: - Explore how to achieve resiliency by optimizing for failure recovery - Learn which industry metrics demonstrate that resiliency - Participate in a virtual roundtable discussion where you can ask the questions most relevant to you Who should attend: - Director/VP of technology teams (Engineering/IT/DevOps/etc) - Technology executives (CIO/CTO) - Management seeking strategic alignment w/ business objectives
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Quantifying Outcomes - Increasing Speed [feedly]



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Quantifying Outcomes - Increasing Speed
// Chef Software

This webinar is part three of a four part series that focuses on the steps you should take to bring about digital transformation in your organization. In this webinar, we talk about how to increase the rate at which you can deploy new software. High-performing organizations that have undergone digital transformation are agile. They respond to market pressures by shipping new features quickly, safely, and reliably. A key requirement of that agility is that these companies can experiment with small-batch incremental changes. But how do you accomplish that and know your efforts are succeeding? This short-form webinar series invites you to participate in a discussion on how to implement digital transformation and which metrics demonstrate progress on your journey. Join us to: - Explore why continuous delivery is about more than just having build pipelines - Learn which industry metrics demonstrate that you're shipping faster successfully - Participate in a virtual roundtable discussion where you can ask the questions most relevant to you Who should attend: - Director/VP of technology teams (Engineering/IT/DevOps/etc) - Technology executives (CIO/CTO) - Management seeking strategic alignment w/ business objectives
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Testing at the Edges [feedly]



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Testing at the Edges
// Chef Software

As you become a more sophisticated Chef, the complexity of the recipes you write increases. You find yourself querying data from the Chef server or requesting the state of an operating system component. You're using complex logic that is abstracted behind helper methods. However, these advanced recipes require equally advanced tests. In this webinar, Franklin Webber, Training and Technical Content Lead at Chef, will show you some approaches to testing complex recipes. He'll explain mocking and stubbing and then apply those techniques to verify recipes that use search, resource guards, and helper methods. Join us to learn: - How to test recipes that are powered by search and data bags - How to test resource guards - How to test helper methods Who should attend: Chef users with experience using ChefSpec, InSpec, and Test Kitchen
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Validation Key in Azure Chef Extension [feedly]



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Validation Key in Azure Chef Extension
// Chef Blog

Setting the validation key in the Azure Chef Extension

Chef has an extension in Azure that enables the bootstrapping of chef-client onto new or existing machines. This can be done though the Azure portal or using an Azure Resource Manager (ARM) template.

All of the options that the extension supports are documented on the Chef Documentation Website. However, there are often issues with the validation key that can upset the formatting JSON when using an ARM template.

The validation key is set in the protected settings of the resource, e.g.:

 {     "name": "[concat(parameters('vmName'),'/ChefExtension')]",     "type": "Microsoft.Compute/virtualMachines/extensions",     "location": "[resourceGroup().location]",     "apiVersion": "2015-06-15",     "properties": {     "publisher": "Chef.Bootstrap.WindowsAzure",     "type": "LinuxChefClient",     "typeHandlerVersion": "1210.12",     "settings": {       "validation_key_format": "base64encoded",       "bootstrap_options": {         "chef_node_name": "[parameters('computerName')]",         "chef_server_url": "[parameters('chefData').serverUrl]",         "validation_client_name": "[parameters('chefData').validator.name]",         "node_ssl_verify_mode": "[parameters('chefData').node.sslVerifyMode]",         "environment": "[parameters('chefData').node.environment]"       },       "runlist": "[parameters('chefData').runlist]",       "client_rb": "[parameters('chefData').node.configuration]",       "validation_key_format": "base64encoded"     },     "protectedSettings": {       "validation_key": "[parameters('chefData').validator.key]"     }   }

NOTE: In the above example the individual settings are defined in a JSON object that is set as a secureObject.

The issue with the formatting is that JSON does not allow carriage returns as a value so they have to be encoded with \n however when dealing with an RSA Private Key this can be daunting and lead to mistakes which means that the JSON is invalid or the key is not written to disk on the node properly.

In the example there is a setting called validation_key_format which can be set to plaintext (default) or base64encoded. It is recommended to use the base64 format as this is one continuous string that can be easily pasted into the template or parameters file. This is also the case when adding the extension to a machine using the portal.

Creating the Base64 encoded key

Creating a base64 encoded string varies on different platforms. The following shows how to do it on Mac OS X, Linux and Windows.

NOTE: The commands used for Mac OS X and Linux are very similar but there are slight variances in the commands on each platform.

Mac OS X

Assuming the validator key is in ~/chef-repo/org-validator.pem the following command will output the encoding to the command line:

 cat ~/chef-repo/org-validator | base64

To save time it is possible to get the command to add this to the clipboard so it is easy to paste into the ARM template:

 cat ~/chef-repo/org-validator | base64 | pbcopy

Linux

Again the validator key is assumed to be in ~/chef-repo/org-validator.pem:

 cat ~/chef-repo/org-validator | base64 -w 0

The base64 command is different here because by default it will add line breaks to the output but this is what is being avoided. To make it output as one string the wrap parameter is set to 0.

NOTE: There is no default program in Linux that would copy this to the clipboard.

Windows

There are two methods to generating the encoded format on Windows. The first depends on having chefdk installed the second is a pure PowerShell version.

As before the key is in ~/chef-repo/org-validator.pem.

NOTE: PowerShell understands the ~ as the home directory as well as being able to use the / as a directory separator.

Method 1 – Using Chef DK

The following uses an mixture of PowerShell and the commands in ChefDK to get the base64 encoded version of the key into the clipboard:

 chef exec cat ~/chef-repo/org-validator.pem | chef exec base64 -w 0 | Set-Clipboard

In this case the path has to be passed to the cat command as a Unix style path with / as the directory separator. The output of the commands is then piped to Set-Clipboard which adds the encoded key to the clipoard.

Method 2 – Using PowerShell

If ChefDK is not installed then the following can be used to generate the encoded key in PowerShell

 cd chef-repo   $path = "~/chef-repo/org-validation.pem"   $Text = Get-Content -Path $path -Raw   $Bytes = [System.Text.Encoding]::Unicode.GetBytes($Text)   [Convert]::ToBase64String($Bytes) | Set-Clipboard

The post Validation Key in Azure Chef Extension appeared first on Chef Blog.


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Monitoring Disk Space [feedly]



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Monitoring Disk Space
// Chef Blog

In 2016, the Chef Support Team marked 147 tickets as being related to inadequate disk space. That's about one ticket every two days. When your system is out of capacity, usually your system is down. It's hard to deliver applications at velocity when you're offline.

It may sound silly to dedicate a blog post to disk space but when our customers are deep in the weeds of digital transformation, this basic consideration sometimes gets forgotten.

You've gotta have disk space. Without it, the Chef server crashes to a halt. If you want your Reporting server to work, you need disk space. That /tmp directory giving you problems? You're going to wish you'd allocated more disk space.

So this is just a reminder, while you're doing all the hard things like working on a new cookbook, or setting up compliance profiles, or convincing a co-worker not to make a change with root, to keep in mind this simple but important rule:

Monitor your disk space to ensure that disks don't fill up or exceed their quota.

Without proactive monitoring and alerting you can expect to have problems, particularly when:

  • The Chef server has Reporting installed but auto-pruning is disabled.
  • The Chef server has no cap on the Analytics RabbitMQ queue.
  • There is a too little  disk capacity left in /var or for the log files.

For details on how to keep the Chef server healthy, visit our docs page on data storage. It describes what you should monitor for signs that disks may be filling up.

The post Monitoring Disk Space appeared first on Chef Blog.


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Friday, February 3, 2017

New! Citrix XenApp & XenDesktop Admin 7.6 LTSR Beta Exam [feedly]



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New! Citrix XenApp & XenDesktop Admin 7.6 LTSR Beta Exam
// Citrix Blogs

The Citrix XenApp and XenDesktop Administration 7.6 LTSR Beta Exam is NOW AVAILABLE! Take the exam — at no cost to you — for a limited time only.

Citrix Education is pleased to announce the availability of the 1Y1-202 Citrix

  

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XenApp and XenDesktop 2017 Release Schedule [feedly]



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XenApp and XenDesktop 2017 Release Schedule
// Citrix Blogs

If you are following Citrix closely, you may have noticed that since Q4 2015, we have released a new version of XenApp and XenDesktop every quarter. These releases are what we call a Current Releases (CR). Our fast-paced, current release …

  

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Welcome CTP Class of 2017!! [feedly]



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Welcome CTP Class of 2017!!
// Citrix Blogs

The Citrix Technology Professionals (CTP) Program award recognizes the contributions of individuals who have invested significant time and resources to become experts in Citrix products and solutions.

They have also selflessly shared their expertise with others in a wide variety …

  

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Windows 8 & Server 2012 Optimization Guide [feedly]



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Windows 8 & Server 2012 Optimization Guide
// Citrix Blogs

With the recent release of XenDesktop 7, we put together a list of recommended optimizations for Windows 8/8.1 and Server 2012 virtual desktops on XenDesktop 7.x. The purpose of this post is to provide a list of commonly applied optimizations …

   

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Verify Your Containerized Applications with NetScaler CPX Now!! [feedly]



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Verify Your Containerized Applications with NetScaler CPX Now!!
// Citrix Blogs

Over the past few years, we have seen significant development in Linux kernel, which has made Containers evolve into an Enterprise-grade technology. With the rapid pace at which Docker and other companies in Container space has progressed, Developers and IT …

  

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Get Your XenApp & XenDesktop Environments In Top Shape with Citrix Smart Tools [feedly]



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Get Your XenApp & XenDesktop Environments In Top Shape with Citrix Smart Tools
// Citrix Blogs

Introducing Citrix Smart Tools: improving security, availability and delivery costs for Citrix XenApp and XenDesktop – on-premises or in the cloud.

The Citrix mission is the secure delivery of apps and data. That resonates now more than ever with our …

  

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Citrix XenServer 7.1: Evolved, Aligned & Integrated [feedly]



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Citrix XenServer 7.1: Evolved, Aligned & Integrated
// Citrix Blogs

We are proud to announce the next release of XenServer 7.1, a significant step in the product's evolution, and which will be made generally available later in Q1.

This latest XenServer release introduces new industry-unique features, and with tighter Citrix …

  

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